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ISBN: 978-1555977856

Don’t Call Us Dead

In order to facilitate meaningful in-person exchanges and economically empower Black-owned bookstores, Noname’s Bookclub will be building partnerships with Black book retailers in major cities to distribute the club’s monthly titles.

The collaboration between Hakim’s Bookstore and Noname’s Book Club is as follows. Each month Noname’s Book Club selects two titles by POC and/or LGBTQ2IA+ authors to discuss among an online and in-person community of readers who (are learning to) love books.

Award-winning poet Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality―the dangers experienced in skin and body and blood―and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “Some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing and ambitious collection, one that confronts, praises, and rebukes America―“Dear White America”―where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.

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About This Book
Overview

In order to facilitate meaningful in-person exchanges and economically empower Black-owned bookstores, Noname’s Bookclub will be building partnerships with Black book retailers in major cities to distribute the club’s monthly titles.

The collaboration between Hakim’s Bookstore and Noname’s Book Club is as follows. Each month Noname’s Book Club selects two titles by POC and/or LGBTQ2IA+ authors to discuss among an online and in-person community of readers who (are learning to) love books.

Award-winning poet Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality―the dangers experienced in skin and body and blood―and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “Some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing and ambitious collection, one that confronts, praises, and rebukes America―“Dear White America”―where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.

“Don’t Call Us Dead”

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